All Climbing https://allclimbing.com Everything climbing and the outdoors. Mon, 08 Jan 2024 14:02:21 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.9 1268015 Introducing the Climbing Digest email newsletter https://allclimbing.com/introducing-the-climbing-digest-email-newsletter/ Sun, 17 Feb 2019 22:19:54 +0000 https://allclimbing.com/?p=2088 There have now been three issues of the weekly Climbing Digest email newsletter, so I thought it was time to talk about the project in a little bit more in detail. As I mentioned in my site re-boot post, one of the projects I’ve wanted to launch for a while (quite literally years, as I […]

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There have now been three issues of the weekly Climbing Digest email newsletter, so I thought it was time to talk about the project in a little bit more in detail. As I mentioned in my site re-boot post, one of the projects I’ve wanted to launch for a while (quite literally years, as I registered the climbingdigest.com domain back in May 2011) is an email newsletter. The overall idea is to provide a weekly update on the news and articles I found interesting over the past week. With respect to news, these would be timely, but for other articles, there would be no strict timeline. If I stumble on a great article from six months or a few years ago, I’ll include it if I find it useful or entertaining.

I’ve spent many years curating articles like this — both on the @climbing Twitter account (over 32,000 followers) as well as curating an email newsletter for the Boulder/Denver area called the Startup Digest (which was eventually acquired by Techstars). Here, I spent about three years releasing a popular weekly newsletter highlighting the top events and activities for startups in the region before I handed over the reins to a new volunteer. So I have considerable experience (and enjoyment) building a newsletter and curating content.

So why now after having the initial idea years ago? There are two main reasons. First, my life situation has finally allowed me the opportunity and time to start and continue working on this project in earnest. Second, I feel there’s a large void to be filled concerning climbing news, articles, and overall information.

Many climbing blogs and sites have come and gone, while the total number of climbers has grown significantly. The popularity and growth of email newsletters have also expanded, but there’s not much catering to climbers that are independent of single source media companies like Climbing or Rock and Ice magazines. These newsletters are exclusively a collection of everything they published.

The value of an independent email newsletter (at least in my opinion) is curation without any obligation to a single source.

After only three issues, I’m pleased with the statistics. Both the open rate and click through on the links are way above industry standards (any way you categorize them). So that’s very encouraging, and I’ll be making significant efforts to ensure the content is there to maintain and even improve these stats.

As far as the future, I have no plans other than curating great articles each week. There may or may not be some form of advertising at some point, but for now, the goal is to continue improving the newsletter.

As always, if you have any feedback regarding this project, please leave a comment. And if you’re not already a subscriber, you can sign up here: http://www.climbingdigest.com

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Video: Carlo Traversi – Gym. Crag. Repeat. https://allclimbing.com/video-carlo-traversi-gym-crag-repeat/ Fri, 08 Feb 2019 18:02:44 +0000 http://www.allclimbing.com/?p=1802 From Black Diamond: It all started in the gym for BD Athlete Carlo Traversi. Now, 15 years later, he’s come full circle, tracing his roots back to where it began, only this time, as the owner of Sacramento’s new premier bouldering gym. But Carlo’s motivation is not only to provide quality plastic pulling, but also […]

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From Black Diamond:

It all started in the gym for BD Athlete Carlo Traversi. Now, 15 years later, he’s come full circle, tracing his roots back to where it began, only this time, as the owner of Sacramento’s new premier bouldering gym. But Carlo’s motivation is not only to provide quality plastic pulling, but also to create what he experienced growing up—a communal place for climbers to train and hang out, but also be mentored and taught the valuable ethics needed for the crag. Check out this film documenting Carlo’s journey from the gym to the crag and back again.

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Video: Jimmy Webb, Nine Days at the New River Bounty https://allclimbing.com/video-jimmy-webb-nine-days-at-the-new-river-bounty/ Thu, 24 Jan 2019 18:07:27 +0000 https://allclimbing.com/?p=2023 Jimmy Webb: Nine Days at the New River Bounty from Kevin Takashi Smith on Vimeo. From the New River Alliance of Climbers (NRAC): In November of 2017, Jimmy Webb traveled to West Virginia to compete in the New River Bounty, a unique bouldering competition organized by the New River Alliance of Climbers (NRAC). Climbers were […]

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Jimmy Webb: Nine Days at the New River Bounty from Kevin Takashi Smith on Vimeo.

From the New River Alliance of Climbers (NRAC):

In November of 2017, Jimmy Webb traveled to West Virginia to compete in the New River Bounty, a unique bouldering competition organized by the New River Alliance of Climbers (NRAC). Climbers were given a list of bouldering projects that had “bounties” placed on them – cash prizes for first ascents. This video chronicles the nine days that Jimmy spent at the month-long competition.

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Site reboot for All Climbing https://allclimbing.com/site-reboot-for-all-climbing/ https://allclimbing.com/site-reboot-for-all-climbing/#comments Wed, 23 Jan 2019 01:00:23 +0000 https://allclimbing.com/?p=2075 I started All Climbing back in January 2005 — 14 years now! There have been many ups and downs, including pretty much a full stop back in 2010 when I was in the middle of running a startup. Over the intervening years, while I didn’t post to the site, I continued to curate links on […]

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I started All Climbing back in January 2005 — 14 years now! There have been many ups and downs, including pretty much a full stop back in 2010 when I was in the middle of running a startup. Over the intervening years, while I didn’t post to the site, I continued to curate links on my climbing Twitter account which has grown to over 32,000 followers. From this, I’ve seen what the average climber is interested in reading and what doesn’t resonate.

And while I was burnt out chasing newsy type articles, I have a considerable backlog of article ideas that I’d still like to get out into the world.

The popularity of @climbing Twitter account where I curate climbing links, despite not publishing posts to All Climbing for a while, finally inspired me to update this site.

So all that said, I decided to do a reboot of All Climbing (still in-process of course) and wanted to discuss the various aspects covering the why, how, and what of this process. Much of what I’ve had to do to get it back in form, will be useful to others regardless of the site you may be building.

Fixing the site

Unfortunately, there were a bunch of issues to clean up on the site. From tons of comment spam to an old version of WordPress, there were issues everywhere.

During the time I was not actively working on the site (roughly 2014), over 30,000 comments and trackbacks were posted. Sadly it’s incredibly difficult to clean up these comments using the WordPress dashboard. So I had to do this manually using SQL queries on the database. It helps that I have a technical background or this would have been an even bigger problem!

This took many hours, but I eventually found a semi-reliable pattern I could use to remove thousands of comments at a time. Most of the spam came through during specific time windows, so sorting the comments by date and time, I was able to quickly remove them.

To prevent this from happening in the future, I’m going to turn off comments on a given post after sixty days. This is just my first choice to solve the problem as there are many posts on this site that have an incredible thread of comments. For example, these posts were highly discussed: Aron Ralston update, Partial Rupture to A2 Tendon Pulley, and Review: Vibram Five Fingers Shoes.

But this is the only trade-off I can make at this point to minimize future spam issues and the massive amount of work involved to clean them up. I’ve used Disqus on and off over the years, and I feel like it’s never really helped this issue. If anyone has any suggestions though, I’m open to better solutions than completely turning off comments after a specific time period.

Finally, I also took the opportunity to improve the permalink structure and added SSL to the site.

What’s planned

As for what’s coming and what I have tentatively planned, it breaks down into four areas:

  1. Twitter — First, I’ll keep curating links on Twitter. This is the everything bucket, with a much higher dose of news than on the blog. Basically, if I find it interesting and it’s related to climbing or the outdoors, I’ll be sharing it. To date, the average is less than one Tweet per day.
  2. Articles — I plan to have regular articles, though I’m not sure on the frequency. Likely no more than a post per week and way less news-focused that it used to be on the site.
  3. Videos — I love watching climbing videos, and I know you do as well. I plan to highlight a video on a weekly basis, assuming there’s something I find super interesting. This is highly curated and the best of what I consume.
  4. Email newsletter — Finally, I’m starting an email newsletter called the Climbing Digest. This email will essentially be curated from everything I post on the blog and Twitter, with some extras included. So if you follow on Twitter and read the site, you’ll still get value from the email newsletter.

The big picture here though is that I’m never going to post for the sake of posting on a regular basis, which is a trap I most definitely fell into back in the old days.

Over the years, my passion for climbing has never faded, but I’ve found my related interests have grown to include more mountaineering, skiing, trail running, and even mountain biking. Anything that involves playing in the mountains is fair game to write about at this point. Hence the new tagline: “Everything climbing, mountains, and the outdoors.”

I’m happy to be back and hope you’ll join me for the ride.

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Best Fitness Trackers for Kids https://allclimbing.com/best-fitness-trackers-for-kids/ Sun, 13 Jan 2019 23:50:18 +0000 https://allclimbing.com/?p=2012 The number of children with obesity has more than tripled since the 1970s according to the CDC. And data collected from 2015-2016 indicates 1 in 5 children between the ages of 6 to 19 years has obesity. Childhood obesity has immediate and long-term effects — children with obesity are at a higher risk of having […]

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The number of children with obesity has more than tripled since the 1970s according to the CDC. And data collected from 2015-2016 indicates 1 in 5 children between the ages of 6 to 19 years has obesity. Childhood obesity has immediate and long-term effects — children with obesity are at a higher risk of having other chronic health conditions, tend to be bullied and teased more compared to children with a healthy weight, and increases the chances to become obese as an adult.

Kids who are physically active tend to have better grades, school attendance, memory, concentration, and behavior. As an active family who likes to hike, rock climb, and ski, I want to instill in my kids the desire to stay fit and maintain a healthy lifestyle. Also, the more technologically advanced kids become nowadays, the higher the chance they’ll succeed in the future. There’s no better way to accomplish this than incorporating the use of technology into their daily lives.

To encourage this, I decided to get fitness trackers for our daughters who are six and nine years old. The primary functions in fitness trackers I was looking for were pretty basic: waterproof, displays the date and time, step tracking, and relatively long battery life.

I’ve found that these devices are useful even for young children. My 5-year-old can benefit from a fitness tracker by being aware of the current month, day, and time. She can answer many questions on her own now — How much longer until lunchtime? Is it almost time to go home? With the addition of timers, kids also get a better feel for time and actually how long is five, ten, fifteen, etc. minutes. Time is one of those concepts that is difficult to explain and needs personal experience on a repetitive basis to truly understand.

With the ability to set personal timers, children can also learn time management. Kids can tell what time of the day it is and choose when to start their thirty minutes of daily reading as an example.

Kids are also intrigued by tracking their physical activities, like hiking, walking, or running, and comparing step counts. It’s a fun way for the family to engage in friendly competition, encouraging each other to reach our individual fitness goals. If you’re looking for additional resources or tips on family fitness, websites like Americansportandfitness.com can provide valuable insights.

All that said, below are some of the best fitness trackers for kids that made my list.

Garmin Vivofit Jr

Vivofit Jr collection

The popular Garmin Vivofit Jr is first on the list. With a battery life of 1+ year, it’s one less thing for kids (and me!) to worry about. After all, frequent battery charging is a hassle. Combined with the waterproof feature, the Garmin Vivofit Jr eliminates the need for kids to remove (and possibly lose) their fitness trackers.

The device capabilities are intuitive to use. There is only one button on the device that lets them cycle through the functions and make selections. They can easily see the month, date and time, the number of steps they have so far, and how close they are to their daily activity goal. As a side note, the United States Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans recommends at least 60 minutes of physical activity each day.

The stretchy band is pretty small though. It fit my 5-year-old, but not my 8-year-old. Fortunately, that’s not much of an issue since there are replacement bands for purchase.

Pros Cons
  • 1+ year battery life
  • “Swim friendly” which means waterproof
  • Functions are intuitive to use
  • Tracks steps, set timer (2, 5, 10, 20, and 30 minutes), tracks sleep (light and deep sleep), displays date and time and provides reward games if the 60 minutes daily activity goal is met
  • Setup is a breeze
  • Stretchy band is pretty small
  • The screen is black and white and measures 10 x 10 mm
  • Functions are solid but basic

The Garmin Vivofit Jr currently runs about $50 at Amazon.

Garmin Vivofit Jr 2

Vivofit Jr 2 collection

Interestingly, I found the Garmin Vivofit Jr 2 for only about $10 – $20 more! Version 2 has the same functions as version 1 (see above) but with some significant improvements. The Garmin Vivofit Jr 2 is intended for ages 4+. Version 2 has a colorful screen sized at 11 x 11 mm. In my opinion, the screen makes a big difference to children especially since they are used to colorful screens elsewhere, such as TVs, iPads, etc.

The Garmin Vivofit Jr 2 also comes with a lot more designs to choose from both in stretchy bands and adjustable bands. Kids can also set up to two timers. Due to this, I purchased the Garmin Vivofit Jr 2 for each of my daughters.

Setup was a breeze. I merely had to download the free Garmin Vivofit Jr app onto my phone, and then create an account to pair the fitness trackers to my phone. One account can have multiple profiles. So at a glance, I can view details for both of my daughters.

After three months of daily use, I did have to change the battery for one of the fitness trackers. Fortunately, it was an easy process. I did have an issue syncing the time though, which was two minutes behind. Garmin customer support was GREAT and immediately walked me through the steps on how to resolve the issue.

Pros Cons
  • 1+ year battery life
  • “Swim friendly” which means waterproof
  • Functions are intuitive to use
  • Tracks steps, set timer (2, 5, 10, 20, and 30 minutes), tracks sleep (light and deep sleep), displays date and time and provides reward games if the 60 minutes daily activity goal is met.
  • Setup is a breeze
  • More band options with the adjustable band
  • Colorful screen sized at 11 x 11mm
  • Functions are solid but basic

The Garmin Vivofit Jr 2 currently runs about $60 at Amazon.

A few months later, my oldest daughter lost her fitness tracker. I’m pretty sure it’s still at home, but we were unable to locate it after a week of searching. Which means I was in the market again to research and purchase another fitness tracker. This time I wanted a fitness tracker with the weather function. Living in Colorado, the weather changes constantly and she’s always asking for the weather forecast when picking out her school clothes.

In short, I want all the functions of the Garmin Vivofit Jr 2 plus weather. With the additional weather function, it seemed I was entering the adult fitness tracker or smartwatch market.

Here’s what I found.

Garmin Vivofit 4

Vivofit 4 collection

The Garmin Vivofit 4 seems to be an adult version of the Garmin Vivofit Jr 2. It has the weather function plus all the benefits of the Vivofit Jr 2.

Pros
  • 1+ year battery life
  • “Swim friendly” which means waterproof
  • Tracks sleep, displays date and time, monitors sleep
  • Has a weather function

The Garmin Vivofit 4 currently runs about $60 at Amazon.

Garmin Vivosmart 3

Vivosmart 3 collection

The Garmin Vivosmart 3 has a larger screen compared to the Vivofit Jr and the Vivofit 4. The device is waterproof which is a requirement in my opinion. It also has the weather function, my key requirement. This fitness tracker does not have GPS though and is, therefore, a satellite device to a smartphone. To update the weather, the fitness tracker needs to be near the phone where the app is installed.

The Vivosmart 3 has some interesting, advanced functions. It can monitor heart rate 24/7, as well as the number of calories burned. This Garmin device also includes their Smart Notifications function where the user can view emails and text messages right from their wrist. As you can see, this fitness tracker is more intended for adults.

Battery life is only up to five days. On the plus side, it has a small and thin profile. The band is not changeable though, so if the band breaks, it’s a significant issue.

Pros Cons
  • “Swim friendly” which means waterproof
  • Has a small and thin profile
  • Tracks steps, sleep, ability to set a timer, and weather
  • Interesting functions such as heart rate monitoring and calories burned
  • Shorter battery life
  • Cannot change bands

The Garmin Vivosmart 3 currently runs about $73 at Amazon.

Fitbit Ace

Fitbit Ace collection

The Fitbit Ace is intended for kids ages 8+. It doesn’t have the weather function. A huge negative is it is “showerproof – survives splashes and spills”. Which means to me it is not swim friendly or waterproof. Taking long showers or baths might be an issue. I’m a proponent of wearing fitness trackers 24/7. Especially for kids, having to take their fitness trackers off increases the risk of losing it.

Since this fitness tracker doesn’t have the weather function and not waterproof, the Fitbit Ace was not an option for us.

Pros Cons
  • Tracks steps, active minutes, sleep, display date and time, and can set a timer
  • Aims to motive kids to reach 60 active minutes daily
  • Ten fun clock faces to choose from
  • Shorter batter life
  • “showerproof – survives splashes and spills” not swim friendly. Taking showers or baths with it might be an issue

The Fitbit Ace currently runs about $99 at Amazon.

Apple Watch Series 3 (38mm)

Apple Series 3

Both my husband and I owned Apple watches. Before that, I cannot remember the last time I wore a watch on my wrist. The design of the watch is compact and efficient. The functions are intuitive to use; I didn’t even need to read the manual that came with it. I quickly got used to wearing it 24/7. I was able to monitor my health better and getting hourly notices to breathe or stand up helps too.

The notion of getting an Apple Watch for my oldest daughter was especially enticing around the holidays when the prices dropped by $80. Why deal with all the possible issues that might occur with other fitness trackers when I know the Apple watch works so well? Aside from a fitness tracker, it’s also a smartwatch. In the end though, I couldn’t justify sending her off to school with such an expensive item.

Pros Cons
  • Waterproof
  • Compact and efficient design; functions are intuitive to use
  • A smartwatch with fitness tracker functions
  • Built-in GPS, which allows for more accurate tracking of distance, speed, and map routing; built-in GPS also enables many other functions without the need to have the paired iPhone nearby
  • The price point is high
  • Shorter battery life

The Apple Watch Series 3 currently runs about $280 at Amazon.

I ended up replacing the lost Garmin Vivofit Jr 2 with the Garmin Vivosmart 3 for my oldest daughter. The Garmin Vivosmart 3 fits our needs quite well. My daughter likes the weather function and finds the other advanced features interesting such as the ability to monitor her heart rate during different activities. The larger screen is also a bonus.

Parenting is a huge and complex responsibility. As parents, it’s our responsibility to do our best for them now and ensure they have a bright future. While this is a small action in the greater scheme of things, I’m glad we got fitness trackers for both our daughters. As a family, we like to see who has the most steps after a day trip, thereby encouraging each other to reach our daily fitness goals. And the ability for young kids to include technology into their daily lives is tremendous. Especially with this improved understanding of time, they can manage their daily activities better and plan for the days to come. If you have kids and haven’t considered getting them a fitness tracker, there’s never been a better time to start!

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Video: Will Gadd Takes On Helmcken Falls with Natural Gear https://allclimbing.com/video-will-gadd-takes-on-helmcken-falls-with-natural-gear/ Tue, 11 Dec 2018 01:29:50 +0000 http://www.allclimbing.com/?p=1810 From Black Diamond: BD Athlete Will Gadd has been putting Black Diamond gear to the test for over 20 years. He was an early proponent of our revolutionary carbon fiber ice tools—now known as the Cobra—and has been questing to the top of ice formations around the world with prototype ice gear ever since. From […]

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From Black Diamond:

BD Athlete Will Gadd has been putting Black Diamond gear to the test for over 20 years. He was an early proponent of our revolutionary carbon fiber ice tools—now known as the Cobra—and has been questing to the top of ice formations around the world with prototype ice gear ever since. From climbing Niagara Falls with prototype ice pitons, to going big in Greenland with extra-long special-made ice screws, Gadd is always willing to put it all on the line for the sake of adventure … and invaluable feedback to the designers and engineers here at BD. Recently, his latest hare-brained idea involved multiple innovations—as well as his own Canadian ingenuity—and was captured in this film. Check out Gadd’s latest gear testing exploits as he takes the formidable spray ice of Helmcken Falls … with natural gear.

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Louder Than Eleven and ClimbingNarc’s Talkshow #1 The Show With No Name https://allclimbing.com/louder-than-eleven-and-climbingnarcs-talkshow-1-the-show-with-no-name/ Mon, 09 Sep 2013 22:11:34 +0000 http://www.allclimbing.com/?p=1763 I finally got around to watching last week’s Louder Than Eleven and ClimbingNarc‘s Talkshow #1 The Show With No Name. Brian interviewed professional climbers Paul Robinson and Alex Johnson on a variety of topics including viewer submitted questions. I found the training discussion (first 20 minutes) particularly interesting. Looking forward to the next one!

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I finally got around to watching last week’s Louder Than Eleven and ClimbingNarc‘s Talkshow #1 The Show With No Name. Brian interviewed professional climbers Paul Robinson and Alex Johnson on a variety of topics including viewer submitted questions. I found the training discussion (first 20 minutes) particularly interesting. Looking forward to the next one!

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Climbing and Startups https://allclimbing.com/climbing-and-startups/ https://allclimbing.com/climbing-and-startups/#comments Wed, 09 Jun 2010 17:24:21 +0000 http://www.allclimbing.com/?p=1701 I haven’t posted in a while, so I thought I’d share with everyone the reason why. I’ve been heads down for the past several months working on my new company, StatsMix. We’re building a web-based service that creates custom dashboards bringing together internal and external metrics in one place so businesses can make better decisions […]

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I haven’t posted in a while, so I thought I’d share with everyone the reason why. I’ve been heads down for the past several months working on my new company, StatsMix. We’re building a web-based service that creates custom dashboards bringing together internal and external metrics in one place so businesses can make better decisions and gain insights.

StatsMix took TechStars founders out for a day of climbing in Boulder Canyon recently. I spoke about the relationship between climbing and building a startup in the following video taken during the trip (starting at 3:27 in the video):

"Be Fearless. Today" The Founders | TechStars Boulder | Episode 3 from Megan Sweeney on Vimeo.

If anyone is interested in trying out StatsMix, we’re currently in private beta so just leave your email on the StatsMix site and I’ll get you in as soon as possible.

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Interview with Dougald MacDonald of Colorado MoJo https://allclimbing.com/interview-with-dougald-macdonald-of-colorado-mojo/ https://allclimbing.com/interview-with-dougald-macdonald-of-colorado-mojo/#comments Mon, 21 Dec 2009 16:02:46 +0000 http://www.allclimbing.com/?p=1686 Dougald MacDonald recently launched a new site focused on the Colorado backcountry called Colorado MoJo. I caught up with him to ask some questions about the site. What prompted you to start a new website focused specifically on Colorado outdoor pursuits? I started Colorado MoJo because I couldn’t find anything else online that covers all […]

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Colorado MoJo

Dougald MacDonald recently launched a new site focused on the Colorado backcountry called Colorado MoJo. I caught up with him to ask some questions about the site.

What prompted you to start a new website focused specifically on Colorado outdoor pursuits?

I started Colorado MoJo because I couldn’t find anything else online that covers all the outdoor sports I love, close to home. There are lots of great outdoor sites, but they’re mostly sport-specific. Most people I know don’t just climb…they also ski or mountain bike or hike 14ers. There was a need for one site that covers multiple backcountry sports, and exclusively in Colorado.

The other issue is that many of the best sites are forum-driven, and you have to read through a mountain of posts every day to get the most out of the site. With Colorado MoJo, we sort through all that information and only publish the real gems, the must-reads. Essentially, it’s a daily online news magazine.

Have you encountered any specific challenges launching a site focused on the Colorado backcountry?

Just lack of time. There is so much to cover, but this is still very much a part-time gig.

What types of content will Colorado MoJo publish?

All Colorado. Mostly backcountry. I started the site with the sports I know best: rock and ice climbing, mountaineering, hiking, backcountry skiing, and trail running. We’ll expand from there, but only when we have real experts to manage those pages.

The site is designed to be about 50 or 60 percent news, 25 or 30 percent inspiration and how-to information, and the rest off-beat, unpredictable stuff. We take a pretty broad definition of “news.” In climbing terms, that might be new routes or access issues, but it also includes first-person stories about cool climbs, epic tales, and photo- and video-driven stories.

We’re building a library of Classics, and we want to create mini-guides to climbing areas that aren’t well known. Obviously, a lot of this information is already available at sites like Mountain Project or Summit Post, but we think there’s an opportunity to present it in a fresh and possibly more useful way.

Please talk a bit about what you don’t cover and why.

The main thing at this time of year is we’re not covering resort skiing and climbing gyms and indoor competitions. Nothing wrong with those things, but Colorado MoJo is focused on the backcountry. That said, something like the Ouray Ice Festival would fit in our pages.

We’re not covering mountain biking or paddling yet, though that could change in 2010. And we’re not doing gear reviews. I think we’ll eventually start covering equipment, but not until we can do it in a way that brings something new to the table. There’s not a lot of truly Colorado-specific gear.

How many contributors do you have so far? Any trends you’re seeing with what is being submitted?

I launched the site in late November, and until now I’ve either written or solicited most of the stories. I’ve been getting some great contributions from climbing and ski guides around the state. They really know their local areas. I’m hoping to have a couple of regular contributors on board very, very soon, and that will broaden and deepen the coverage, especially in skiing.

How can my readers contribute? Any content type or activity that is currently under-represented?

We need to set up better ways for readers to contribute, but the door is definitely open. We’re looking for stories about new routes, epic adventures (in Colorado), and just great days out in the hills. Photo essays or video clips are super-cool. I’m also looking for Classics and mini-guides. People should contact me directly if they have an idea: mojo@coloradomountainjournal.com.

Lots of times, people post a story or report at one of the big forum-based sites and it immediately gets buried. We can lay out a reader’s contribution in a way that will really showcase it, so it will stand out from the crowd, and it will be highlighted for much longer on Colorado MoJo than elsewhere.

On a personal level, what are your favorite aspects of the Colorado backcountry?

Well, I’ve always been a climber first. I’ve been climbing for more than 30 years, and what keeps me going strong is variety: I like mixed routes in the mountains as much as sport climbs at Shelf Road. But, as I said before, I just like to spend lots of time in the mountains, and so I also love skiing, hiking, and trail running.

Anything additional you’d like to share with All Climbing’s readers about Colorado MoJo?

The site is brand new and still developing, and we’re eager to hear from readers with story ideas and suggestions for what they’d like to see at MoJo. Drop me a line! We’re also on Facebook and Twitter, and those pages get updated even more frequently than the main site.

Dougald MacDonald has been skiing since he was 3, hiking since he was 5, and climbing since he was 16. He moved to Colorado in 1987, specifically for the mountains. Dougald was the publisher and editor in chief of Rock & Ice magazine for a number of years, and was the founding publisher of Trail Runner magazine. These days, he’s an associate editor of the American Alpine Journal, and writes most of the news for Climbing.com. Dougald also writes frequently for Outside, Backpacker, 5280, Men’s Journal, and many other magazines. He also wrote the book Longs Peak: The Story of Colorado’s Favorite Fourteener. He also writes a personal blog for the past five years at (http://themountainworld.blogspot.com).

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Climbing Video: Erik Weihenmayer Climbs The Naked Edge https://allclimbing.com/climbing-video-erik-weihenmayer-climbs-the-naked-edge/ https://allclimbing.com/climbing-video-erik-weihenmayer-climbs-the-naked-edge/#comments Sun, 20 Dec 2009 18:52:42 +0000 http://www.allclimbing.com/?p=1676 Blind climber Erik Weihenmayer, climbs Eldorado Canyon’s The Naked Edge to benefit the Access Fund in this incredibly inspiring video. (via Colorado MoJo, Prana)

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Blind climber Erik Weihenmayer, climbs Eldorado Canyon’s The Naked Edge to benefit the Access Fund in this incredibly inspiring video.

(via Colorado MoJo, Prana)

The post Climbing Video: Erik Weihenmayer Climbs The Naked Edge first appeared on All Climbing.

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